Understanding Anime: The Trigger Twist, a Coinable Term Or a Misguided Assumption

darling in the franxx 2

Just about any community in life has it’s own lingo and as I’m sure you’re all aware anime is no exception.  Waifus, Moe, Tsundere, etc.  The list is long and yet here I am making one up – The Trigger Twist.  If the picture above isn’t enough to clue you in I decided to bring out this term as a result of the sudden shift in Darling Franxx’s story, a shift that threw a lot of people but which in retrospect is not obvious per se but is perhaps expected.  There will be scattered spoilers ahead.

The most obvious parallel which one can draw to the Trigger Twist is the infamous Gainax Ending, a term coined because of the number of WTF endings in Gainax shows.  My personal favorite example of this term in action was the sudden end of Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt, where Stocking turns on her sister/partner apropos of nothing and chops her into tiny bits before walking off to be the presumed villain of a sequel which never came out.  It was so sudden and out of left field that it still confuses the fuck out of me.  I can easily see the same being true for Darling in the Franxx, the shift was jarring.  However I think this deserves it’s own term because A. the confusion brought on by the jarring shift wore off while the aforementioned Gainax Ending is still baffling, and more importantly B. this is a traceable trend in the works of Hiroyuki Imaishi.

Perhaps the Trigger Twist isn’t a totally accurate term as it’s not as though Imaishi is the only director working for the studio.  That being said he not only co-founded the studio but is far and away the name most commonly associated with the studio so I think the term fits well enough even if I’m describing a tendency of Imaishi’s not Trigger behavior on the whole.  Barring Dead Leaves, which I know nothing about, and Panty and Stocking – which as detailed above is a classic example of the Gainax Ending – all of the major projects Imaishi has had a major hand in have the same twist, it turns out the main enemies are actually aliens which threaten humanity’s existence.  This trend predates Trigger as Gurren Lagann is the first main example that comes to mind, but it has continued into Trigger and is present in more of the major productions than not.

Kill la Kill, Space Patrol Luluco and now Darling in Franxx stand beside Gurren Lagann as shows where the story takes a sudden shift and a new existence threatening enemy is revealed later on.  Luluco is by far the hardest sell on this point as the existential threat appears basically at the end and most of the episodes are clear references to Imaisihi’s past works but it counts in my book.  Kill la Kill and Darling in the Franxx are much more clear cut examples of the Trigger Twist in action, and of the two I think Darling in the Franxx is the one where the Trigger Twist was felt most strongly.

Kill la Kill was such an over-the-top, stupid action thrill ride (in my humble opinion the best of such that anime has to offer) that when the final enemy was revealed and the History channel Aliens meme went into full effect it really didn’t take you out of the experience.  It was Kill la Kill, where clothes could talk, clothes made you superhuman, a 20 year old was in high school, Ragyou wore the most hideous clown outfit in human history, Mako could defy any sense of logic or physics (a good thing), and we still don’t know what all made it into Mako’s mom’s mystery croquettes.  Adding aliens to the mix was perfectly in step with the wacky, violent world of Kill la Kill.  It wasn’t necessarily predictable but it wasn’t jarring.

By contrast the Trigger Twist in Darling the Franxx was very jarring and seems to have at least somewhat split the community on the show as a whole.  Speaking for myself, up until the Trigger Twist I had pegged Darling the Franxx as a cross between Evangelion, for obvious reasons you’ve no doubt heard before, and Shinsekai Yori with it’s strong focus on the gaps in knowledge between the adults and the kids, the use of brainwashing to control the children, the use of a control group (the main characters) and a strong sense that the rift between the adults and the kids would become the source of a great conflict.  That potential conflict had it’s legs cut from under it with the Trigger Twist and the big reveal of VIRM.

Personally I thought the VIRM arc of the show was handled pretty well with the confusion when they first showed up during the fight with the klaxosaurs, the big space battle that followed and the separation of the cast where Zero Two and Hiro went off to kill the VIRM homeworld and the rest set about making the foundations for reviving human civilization.  That being said I can see the negatives of this particular Trigger Twist, the shift was so sudden and so different from the direction the story seemed to be heading in that I can see why people were confused or perhaps thought of it more like a bait-and-switch than Kill la Kill or Gurren Lagann.  As much as I like the show I think it’s about a 7-8 which is a shame because I thought it could definitely be a 9 or maybe even a 10 if handled well enough – before the Trigger Twist went into effect.

This is not to say that experience was wholly or even mostly negative but I do think the Trigger Twist definitely pushed Darling in the Fraxx into a different and for me less gripping trajectory.  I still like the show, I like the klaxosaur designs, I like some of the details of moving cities and their society, I like the entire main team, Zero Two is totally a contender for best girl of the year, and I think the mechs with faces that could emote to match the female pilot was perhaps the greatest innovation in mech design in anime history.  No I am not joking, I’m not a big mecha fan but I loved these mechs because they had so much more character than the competition.

That being said there is only one question remaining:  Do you think the Trigger Twist is just some bullshit I made up and should remain that way or do you think it’s some bullshit I just made up that should perhaps be added to anime lingo?  Comment below with your response.

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Surly Summaries: Winter 2018 Roundup

Darling-in-the-Franxx

You know many moons ago I complained about certain anime seasons being total shit.  Today I look back at my old self and give me a “if only you knew” kind of look.  Because this season is legitimately the worst season in years.  There’s almost nothing that’s actually good or interesting despite their being another huge chunk of shows to actually watch.  Also there’s basically nothing in the way of solid sequels to help pad the season out – the only one off hand that might fill that role is Nanats no Taizai season 2, but having read the manga and hating where it goes I’m skipping that one despite really liking season 1.  Since this season was so barren I figured I’d do a 3 episode test on the few shows i’m actually watching.  There will be spoilers ahead.

Basilisk: Ouka Ninpouchou – I’m actually a big fan of the original Basilisk so I was bewildered to see a sequel.  If you want a spoiler free review of season 1, it’s here, and I do recommend season 1 as it was a good show.  However considering the ending I never would have believed it would have gotten a sequel much less one set only 10 years after the events of season 1.  Having seen 3 episodes of the sequel I can say I was right to be wary.  It’s not so much that it has been bad – it’s just not been good – and it has some problems.  For example why are the young recruits from the two ninja villages, Iga and Kouga, split along gendered lines?  In Basilisk season 1 both sides had men and women fighting.  How are Hachirou and Hibiki related to Gennosuke and Oboro exactly?  Both of those characters died before they had kids.  Speaking of which why does Hibiki look nothing like Oboro and why do her mystic eyes not match up with Oboro’s?  The village leaders insist she’s connected to Oboro but they describe her mystic eyes as neutralizing all hostility while Oboro’s eyes simply destroyed unnatural techniques, i.e. all ninjutsu/ninpou.  My problem is not that this show outright sucks but it looks to me like the team putting it together have a surface level understanding of Basilisk.  Forgetting all the details they have which don’t make sense, their uglier character designs and willingness to kill characters off are reminiscent of Basilisk – but nonetheless the whole thing feels very off and I’m not sure I want to continue.

Citrus – Yuri.  Nuff said.  Ok it could be Shoujo Ai… In all seriousness this show is just ok so far.  The story is very basic and while it’s not as slow and irritating as most shoujo shows are to me it is nonetheless carried by the fact it has lots of yuri fanservice to distract viewers from the thus far lackluster story and characters.  It’s a decent time but nothing spectacular – unless you loving seeing hot girls kiss.

Darling in the Franxx – So far this is the best show of the season.  Episode one was top tier with a great battle, weird monsters, tons of explosions and a bizarre looking mech.  I love Zero Two, the whimsical horned girl who has a nasty habit of overwhleming and damaging her partners.  What partners you ask?  Darling in the Franxx pulls a Pacific Rim and it takes two people, this time male and female to pilot a Franxx and fight the monsters, klaxosaurs.  Also emotions and one’s state of mind have a major effect on piloting the Franxx so managing the teenage pilots is going to be a big part of the show.  This in fact leads me to my main issue with Darling in the Franxx.  The world looks like a wasteland and what little politics have been shown give the society a distinctly dystopian edge, though it may be a justified one considering the monsters at their doorstep.  Excuse my sounding tyrannical but this society needs to control the kids better.  Not counting the anomaly that is Zero Two, most of the problems in making the kids combat effective come from their attitudes screwing with their compatibility.  Wouldn’t it make more sense to either control the kids with strict rules to create a less emotional children a la Shin Sekai Yori or to have the kids constantly doing the kind synchronization training Shinji and Asuka did in Evangelion to fight the twin angel?  I feel like either process would have better results than letting these kids run amok and destroying their own squad with huge egos and shitty behavior.  Also the pairs seem to be random considering the swathe of comparability problems, so maybe that needs work too.  Minor criticism of the setting aside this show is great and you should watch it.

Grancrest Senki – In season less barren than this I wouldn’t have even given this show a look.  It’s pretty bog standard fantasy action fare with simplistic and boring politics, bland characters and unexplained magic.  It has a strong military bent to it but while individual parts of the battles are great, overall it’s not that impressive.  I’m probably dropping this because what little charm it had has already worn off.

Killing Bites – This show is trash and I love it.  There’s something special about shitty action shows that know how trash they are just not giving a single fuck and plunging headlong into more fanservice and basic action scenes.  It’s not the kind of show which should ever be taken seriously and because of that it’s kind of fun.  Definitely a better way to pass the time than the last show I talked about.

Koi wa Ameagari You ni – Honestly I don’t get the appeal of this show.  The art style looks pretty but the main girl and her best friend on the track team have all kinds weird proportions.  Both of their upper legs are way too long, main girl’s neck looks too long in close up shots and track club senpai has noticeably bigger eyes than main girl and even her eyes look a little too big for her face.  The romance is between a quiet, seemingly anti-social high school girl and generic nice guy 45 year old.  I guess some people are into that but I certainly don’t see why.  It’s not a bad show and I’ll probably keep watching but it’s not a great time either.

Kokkoku – This one is weird.  So there’s this dirt poor family that has a rock which can stop time and after two members of the family are kidnapped at random they use the rock.  Unbeknownst to them they are being monitored by a cult which worships the rock and it’s time powers and they complicate matters immensely by taking yet another hostage and trying to kill Juri, the main girl.  At the rate this show is going they might have to resolve the entire plot in the pace of one time stop, which seems like a bit much but whatever.  Also the main family has extra powers like teleportation and being able to turned people who aren’t frozen in time into people frozen in time.  This show has a good mystery thriller vibe and the episodes are flying by, but it seems like a lot to resolve quickly so let’s see where it goes.

Violet Evergarden – This is the outright prettiest show of the season and good luck to anyone trying to top this show’s visuals.  The story has only been ok thus far as it centers around writing letters and the main girl, the titular Violet Evergarden lacks most human emotions.  But that’s ok because the Violet has spent most of her life fighting in a war that recently ended and everyone’s struggling to adjust – she just struggles all the harder because she has no concept of living a peaceful  civilian life like most people.  I’m personally fascinated by the concept of people accustomed to war suddenly struggling with peace so that’s a big plus for me.  Definitely give this one a try.

Hidden Gems: Shin Sekai Yori

You know I have spent hours trying to come up with something special or clever to say for an intro, but since nothing I came up with was doing this show justice, I’ll go with honesty.  I fucking love this show and whole heartedly recommend, nay demand that everyone watch it.  So what does this little known show have going in its favor for me to be so adamant that you watch it?

Let’s begin with the premise.  Our story begins in a small village inhabited by humans who all have psychic powers.  But while the village looks like it came from the ancient past we the viewers are clued in by the first few minutes that this village came about well after the collapse of the modern world.  So we are in a post apocalyptic setting.  Our story follows a group of five psychic tweens.  And here’s where I deviate from the norm because this show has essentially two premises going on at the same time.  Each arc deals with a major conflict but there is also a persistent secondary conflict going on over the entire run time of the show.  This second conflict is the struggle between the new generation and the former, because one of the few things made abundantly clear early on is that something is wrong with this society of psychics.  People go missing, there are rumors of mythical cat beasts that hunt down bad children, and there is a frightening lack of information and transparency.  This is a story where the people our young heroes should be able to trust most, their parents and teachers, are the people who are hiding things from them.

This is one of the things that I thought made Shin Sekai Yori so special.  In an interesting twist we the audience walk into the series with a better understanding of the setting than the kids we experience the story through, but we only know the big picture, the details are hidden from us as well.  So naturally finding these details is a major part of the story.  This is where Shin Sekai Yori really comes into its own, it controls the flow of information very very well.  It never reveals too much too quickly, even when it appears to be doing just that.  The other aspect of this that makes the show so good is that the details are horrifying.  It’s a show that taunts you, giving you all kinds of incentives to seek out answers to all your questions, then when it decides to answer some of them the answers are creepy enough to drive you away from ever seeking more, before the story demands that you seek more answers once again.  It’s a vicious and even perverse cycle that rewards and punishes curiosity simultaneously, and then does all it can to provoke our curiosity.  But this gets into a different strength of the show.

Shin Sekai Yori is eerie.  It doesn’t try to scare you but it constantly feels creepy.  I’ve never had a show or movie that make my hairs stand on end as often as this show did.  And the eeriness is everywhere.  The music is full of children singing in haunting unison.  The art style is at its strongest when it’s dealing with the dark, the twisted and the wrong.  The art style even changes on occasion to a more expressive style to communicate the horror certain stories are meant to teach.  And to add to it all there are frequent and unexplained disappearances, in a society of adults of who punish harshly and never explain anything beyond the basic rules.  And this only gets muddier and murkier as the main characters discover new information, information that brings with it at least as many questions as it does answers, and the answers we have tend to be deeply unsettling.  I’ll say it again, this show is eerie.  The atmosphere is one of confusion and distrust.  But more than that everything we see just feels wrong somehow.  At some fundamental level that we have a hard time consciously explaining, this place and many of the people in it just feel wrong.

Now the level of atmosphere this show has is something to make it worth a watch on its own, but the atmosphere is just one large part of the eerie package.  Shin Sekai Yori is just plain good at storytelling and more importantly given its propensity for the strange, really good at unusual storytelling.  For example each major arc occurs at a different point in the main characters’ lives, which allows us to see how this world and society changes them as they mature.  Likewise the time gaps play into the persistent secondary conflict as the young people we follow make their way into adulthood, and learn more about what being an adult in this society entails.  But at its core this is story that pulls you in.  Every arc begins a little slow but the episodes get progressively faster and faster, and you want to race to the climax of the arc.  And like I mentioned before the show does a great job with how it dispenses information.  It never dispenses too much but it always gives enough answers to encourage further digging.  And all of this stuff comes together in a series that I consider to be very compelling and very unique, which is a combination I don’t get to see often enough.  Anyway I really have nothing further to add so I can avoid giving out spoilers.  I truly do recommend this show quite highly, my gushing praise alone does not properly convey how much esteem I hold this particular show in.  If an atmospheric mystery thriller sounds like something you would enjoy or if you’re looking to try something  a little bit more on the fringes of the anime medium, I strongly encourage you to watch Shin Sekai Yori.  Hopefully you all enjoyed this and I’ll see you in the next one.